www.ahrq.gov/

Advanced Search
Welcome to the Systematic
Review Data Repository
Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.

Scheduled maintenance in day(s).
Click me for more details.
To contribute data or comment on deposited projects, simply Register for an account.


Registered users, log in below:
Forgot Password?

Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

Benefit of Ubiquinone Supplementation for patients with early Parkinson's disease


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 8 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jul 13, 2014 02:05PM
Description: Clinical trials investigating the effect of coenzyme Q10 in protecting the dopaminergic fibers showed different results . Some trials showed slower progress of the disease associated with supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 . However other trials showed no evidence of benefit . Our study aims at synthesizing the evidence in the effect of Ubiquinone on patients with early Parkinson from clinical trials .

Imaging Techniques for Treatment Evaluation for Metastatic Breast Cancer


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 17 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jun 04, 2014 06:13PM
Description: The purpose of this technical brief is to understand current utilization of metastatic breast imaging modalities for treatment evaluation in the United States, both in order to summarize the current state of the science and to inform future research on this topic.

First- and Second- Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 81 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Dec 02, 2013 03:27PM
Description: Methods: Two reviewers conducted study selection and quality assessment independently and resolved discrepancies by consensus. One reviewer extracted data, and a second reviewer verified the data. We conducted a descriptive analysis for all studies and performed metaanalyses when appropriate. Results: Eighty-one studies (64 trials and 17 cohort studies) examined the following conditions: pervasive developmental disorders (12 studies); attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or disruptive behavior disorders (8 studies); bipolar disorder (11 studies); schizophrenia and related psychosis (31 studies); Tourette syndrome (7 studies); behavioral issues (4 studies); and multiple conditions (9 studies). One study reported data on both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The majority of the trials had a high risk of bias. The methodological quality of the cohort studies was moderate. Results are presented by outcome below: Symptoms: The strength of evidence for all head-to-head comparisons of FGAs and SGAs was low or insufficient to draw conclusions. SGAs were favored over placebo for behavior symptoms (ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders), the Clinical Global Impressions scale (ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia), positive and negative symptoms (schizophrenia), and tics (Tourette syndrome) (moderate strength of evidence). Other short- and long-term outcomes: All head-to-head comparisons had low or insufficient strength of evidence. There was no significant difference between SGAs and placebo for suicide related behaviors (moderate strength of evidence). The evidence was rated as insufficient to draw conclusions for health-related quality of life, involvement with the legal system, and other patient-, parent-, or care provider-reported outcomes for all conditions. Adverse events: All outcomes comparing FGAs with SGAs had low or insufficient strength of evidence. Outcomes comparing FGAs versus FGAs and FGAs versus placebo had insufficient evidence. Risperidone was favored over olanzapine for dyslipidemia; olanzapine was favored over risperidone for prolactin-related events; and both quetiapine and risperidone were favored over olanzapine for weight gain (moderate strength of evidence). For nearly all outcomes and comparisons, placebo resulted in significantly fewer adverse events than SGAs. Subpopulations: Thirty-six studies examined the association between various patient subpopulations and outcomes. Most concluded that the results did not differ by subpopulations, or findings were discordant across studies. Conclusion: Evidence comparing FGAs with SGAs, various FGAs, and FGAs with placebo was very limited. Some SGAs appear to have a better side-effect profile than other SGAs. Compared with placebo, SGAs have better symptom improvement but more adverse events. Future high quality research examining head-to-head antipsychotic comparisons is needed.

Benefit of Ubiquinone Supplementation for patients with early Parkinson's disease


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 8 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jul 13, 2014 02:05PM
Description: Clinical trials investigating the effect of coenzyme Q10 in protecting the dopaminergic fibers showed different results . Some trials showed slower progress of the disease associated with supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 . However other trials showed no evidence of benefit . Our study aims at synthesizing the evidence in the effect of Ubiquinone on patients with early Parkinson from clinical trials .

Imaging Techniques for Treatment Evaluation for Metastatic Breast Cancer


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 17 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jun 04, 2014 06:13PM
Description: The purpose of this technical brief is to understand current utilization of metastatic breast imaging modalities for treatment evaluation in the United States, both in order to summarize the current state of the science and to inform future research on this topic.

First- and Second- Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 81 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Dec 02, 2013 03:27PM
Description: Methods: Two reviewers conducted study selection and quality assessment independently and resolved discrepancies by consensus. One reviewer extracted data, and a second reviewer verified the data. We conducted a descriptive analysis for all studies and performed metaanalyses when appropriate. Results: Eighty-one studies (64 trials and 17 cohort studies) examined the following conditions: pervasive developmental disorders (12 studies); attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or disruptive behavior disorders (8 studies); bipolar disorder (11 studies); schizophrenia and related psychosis (31 studies); Tourette syndrome (7 studies); behavioral issues (4 studies); and multiple conditions (9 studies). One study reported data on both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The majority of the trials had a high risk of bias. The methodological quality of the cohort studies was moderate. Results are presented by outcome below: Symptoms: The strength of evidence for all head-to-head comparisons of FGAs and SGAs was low or insufficient to draw conclusions. SGAs were favored over placebo for behavior symptoms (ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders), the Clinical Global Impressions scale (ADHD and disruptive behavior disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia), positive and negative symptoms (schizophrenia), and tics (Tourette syndrome) (moderate strength of evidence). Other short- and long-term outcomes: All head-to-head comparisons had low or insufficient strength of evidence. There was no significant difference between SGAs and placebo for suicide related behaviors (moderate strength of evidence). The evidence was rated as insufficient to draw conclusions for health-related quality of life, involvement with the legal system, and other patient-, parent-, or care provider-reported outcomes for all conditions. Adverse events: All outcomes comparing FGAs with SGAs had low or insufficient strength of evidence. Outcomes comparing FGAs versus FGAs and FGAs versus placebo had insufficient evidence. Risperidone was favored over olanzapine for dyslipidemia; olanzapine was favored over risperidone for prolactin-related events; and both quetiapine and risperidone were favored over olanzapine for weight gain (moderate strength of evidence). For nearly all outcomes and comparisons, placebo resulted in significantly fewer adverse events than SGAs. Subpopulations: Thirty-six studies examined the association between various patient subpopulations and outcomes. Most concluded that the results did not differ by subpopulations, or findings were discordant across studies. Conclusion: Evidence comparing FGAs with SGAs, various FGAs, and FGAs with placebo was very limited. Some SGAs appear to have a better side-effect profile than other SGAs. Compared with placebo, SGAs have better symptom improvement but more adverse events. Future high quality research examining head-to-head antipsychotic comparisons is needed.



Creative Commons LicenseThis graphic notice indicates that you are leaving this Federal Government Web site and entering a non-Federal Web site. Creative Commons  
The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Popular Resources




Help


SRDR Announcements




 

Statistics



Maintenance Schedule