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Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.

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The Evidence Synthesis Academy, an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ 1R25HS023299-01) funded program within the Center for Evidence-based Medicine at Brown University School of Public Health.
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Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

Noninvasive Testing for Coronary Artery Disease [Entered Retrospecively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 46 Studies, 6 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Dec 23, 2015 09:23PM
Description: Structured Abstract Objectives. This report evaluates the current state of evidence regarding effectiveness and harms of noninvasive technologies for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) or dysfunction that results in symptoms attributable to myocardial ischemia in stable symptomatic patients who have no known history of CAD. Data sources. Systematic searches of the following databases were conducted through July 2015: Ovid MEDLINE®, Cochrane CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews–Health Technology Assessment. Bibliographies of relevant articles were also reviewed. Review methods. Using predefined criteria, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing the effectiveness or safety of noninvasive cardiac testing—stress electrocardiography (ECG), stress echocardiography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and calcium scoring via computed tomography—with other noninvasive tests, usual care, or no testing were included. Analyses were stratified by pretest risk of CAD as reported by the authors. The quality of included studies was assessed, data extracted, and results summarized qualitatively and using meta-analysis where feasible. The strength of the evidence was assessed for primary outcomes to reflect the confidence in effect estimates: high strength of evidence (greatest confidence), moderate (moderate confidence), low (low confidence), and insufficient (no evidence or no confidence in the estimate). Results. From 17,146 citations identified, 46 studies were included. Definition of pretest risk across studies varied. There was no clear difference in myocardial infarction (MI) or in all-cause mortality between different testing strategies across settings or pretest risk groups that included patients with intermediate pretest risk, based on low- to moderate-strength evidence from nine trials. Across studies, the frequency was low for all-cause mortality (0%–1.5% in outpatient settings, 0%–1.1% in emergency department [ED] settings past the initial visit) and for MI (0%–0.8% in outpatients, 0%–3% in ED settings). Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) was more common following CCTA than following various functional tests, with a large trial of CCTA versus functional testing providing high-strength evidence. Revascularization referral was more common following CCTA versus functional testing in general (high strength of evidence) and versus exercise ECG (low strength of evidence) but was similar compared with SPECT and usual care (low strength of evidence). In ED settings, additional testing was more common following CCTA than following SPECT (high strength of evidence) but less common versus usual care (moderate strength of evidence). Hospitalization was less common following CCTA than following usual care at the initial ED visit (moderate evidence for intermediate pretest risk; low evidence for low to intermediate pretest risk), but similar for CCTA and functional testing in outpatient settings (moderate strength of evidence). Few studies compared functional tests, and findings were inconsistent for ICA and revascularization referral; however, additional noninvasive testing was less common with SPECT than with exercise ECG (low strength of evidence for all outcomes). The impact of testing on post-test probability of CAD and subsequent clinical decisions regarding treatment or further testing was not described in RCTs. Harms were rarely reported, and limited information regarding radiation exposure was provided. Conclusions. A review of current studies found no clear differences between testing strategies across settings with regard to clinical or management outcomes on which to base recommendations for one strategy over another for any given pretest risk group that included patients with intermediate pretest risk. No conclusions regarding low-risk patients or high-risk patients without ACS are possible. Limited evidence from RCTs found no clear differences between CCTA and other strategies in clinical outcomes across risk groups, although anatomic testing may result in a higher frequency of referral for ICA and revascularization. The frequency of all-cause mortality and MI was low across studies in all settings. The absence of information on post-test risk stratification and subsequent decisionmaking precluded evaluation of the impact of testing on patient management or outcomes. Testing strategies vary in radiation exposure; there is inadequate comparative evidence to make judgments regarding exposure for the initial test or downstream testing. Assessment of harms was limited. Future research using more refined evidence-based definitions of pretest risk, coupled with information on post-test risk stratification, its impact on clinical management (treatment and referral for additional testing), and longer term followup to assess clinical outcomes, are needed to determine optimal testing strategies and roles of tests in different pretest risk groups.

Strategies to Improve Mental Health Care for Children and Adolescents


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 16 Studies, 3 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 11, 2015 03:21PM
Description: To increase knowledge about the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI), implementation, and dissemination strategies that seek to improve the mental health care of children and adolescents; to examine harms associated with these strategies; and to determine whether effectiveness or harms vary in subgroups based on system, organizational, practitioner, or patient characteristics.

Nonpharmacologic Interventions for Agitation and Aggression in Dementia [entered retrospectively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 130 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Oct 27, 2015 08:02PM
Description: None Provided

Dietary Fiber Database, Version 2


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 919 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jan 05, 2016 03:08PM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 9 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.

Noninvasive Testing for Coronary Artery Disease [Entered Retrospecively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 46 Studies, 6 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Dec 23, 2015 09:23PM
Description: Structured Abstract Objectives. This report evaluates the current state of evidence regarding effectiveness and harms of noninvasive technologies for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) or dysfunction that results in symptoms attributable to myocardial ischemia in stable symptomatic patients who have no known history of CAD. Data sources. Systematic searches of the following databases were conducted through July 2015: Ovid MEDLINE®, Cochrane CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews–Health Technology Assessment. Bibliographies of relevant articles were also reviewed. Review methods. Using predefined criteria, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing the effectiveness or safety of noninvasive cardiac testing—stress electrocardiography (ECG), stress echocardiography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and calcium scoring via computed tomography—with other noninvasive tests, usual care, or no testing were included. Analyses were stratified by pretest risk of CAD as reported by the authors. The quality of included studies was assessed, data extracted, and results summarized qualitatively and using meta-analysis where feasible. The strength of the evidence was assessed for primary outcomes to reflect the confidence in effect estimates: high strength of evidence (greatest confidence), moderate (moderate confidence), low (low confidence), and insufficient (no evidence or no confidence in the estimate). Results. From 17,146 citations identified, 46 studies were included. Definition of pretest risk across studies varied. There was no clear difference in myocardial infarction (MI) or in all-cause mortality between different testing strategies across settings or pretest risk groups that included patients with intermediate pretest risk, based on low- to moderate-strength evidence from nine trials. Across studies, the frequency was low for all-cause mortality (0%–1.5% in outpatient settings, 0%–1.1% in emergency department [ED] settings past the initial visit) and for MI (0%–0.8% in outpatients, 0%–3% in ED settings). Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) was more common following CCTA than following various functional tests, with a large trial of CCTA versus functional testing providing high-strength evidence. Revascularization referral was more common following CCTA versus functional testing in general (high strength of evidence) and versus exercise ECG (low strength of evidence) but was similar compared with SPECT and usual care (low strength of evidence). In ED settings, additional testing was more common following CCTA than following SPECT (high strength of evidence) but less common versus usual care (moderate strength of evidence). Hospitalization was less common following CCTA than following usual care at the initial ED visit (moderate evidence for intermediate pretest risk; low evidence for low to intermediate pretest risk), but similar for CCTA and functional testing in outpatient settings (moderate strength of evidence). Few studies compared functional tests, and findings were inconsistent for ICA and revascularization referral; however, additional noninvasive testing was less common with SPECT than with exercise ECG (low strength of evidence for all outcomes). The impact of testing on post-test probability of CAD and subsequent clinical decisions regarding treatment or further testing was not described in RCTs. Harms were rarely reported, and limited information regarding radiation exposure was provided. Conclusions. A review of current studies found no clear differences between testing strategies across settings with regard to clinical or management outcomes on which to base recommendations for one strategy over another for any given pretest risk group that included patients with intermediate pretest risk. No conclusions regarding low-risk patients or high-risk patients without ACS are possible. Limited evidence from RCTs found no clear differences between CCTA and other strategies in clinical outcomes across risk groups, although anatomic testing may result in a higher frequency of referral for ICA and revascularization. The frequency of all-cause mortality and MI was low across studies in all settings. The absence of information on post-test risk stratification and subsequent decisionmaking precluded evaluation of the impact of testing on patient management or outcomes. Testing strategies vary in radiation exposure; there is inadequate comparative evidence to make judgments regarding exposure for the initial test or downstream testing. Assessment of harms was limited. Future research using more refined evidence-based definitions of pretest risk, coupled with information on post-test risk stratification, its impact on clinical management (treatment and referral for additional testing), and longer term followup to assess clinical outcomes, are needed to determine optimal testing strategies and roles of tests in different pretest risk groups.

Disparities Within Serious Mental Illness Technical Brief


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 26 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Nov 05, 2015 08:11PM
Description: Adults with serious mental illness (SMI) often experience gaps in access to needed health care compared with other populations. Such disparities may be even more pronounced between certain groups of patients with SMI, differing by race, ethnicity, gender, economic disadvantage (including housing stability) and socioeconomic status, and geographic location (chiefly, rural versus urban residence); disparities arise as well for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals and those who have difficulty communicating in English (because it is a second language).



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The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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