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Review Data Repository
Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.

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Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

Benefit of Ubiquinone Supplementation for patients with early Parkinson's disease


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 8 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jul 13, 2014 02:05PM
Description: Clinical trials investigating the effect of coenzyme Q10 in protecting the dopaminergic fibers showed different results . Some trials showed slower progress of the disease associated with supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 . However other trials showed no evidence of benefit . Our study aims at synthesizing the evidence in the effect of Ubiquinone on patients with early Parkinson from clinical trials .

Second-Generation Antidepressants in the Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Depression: An update of the 2007 Comparative Effectiveness Review


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 221 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 2 Extraction Forms,
Date Created: Jul 01, 2014 06:45PM
Description: Background: Depressive disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymia, and subsyndromal depression may be serious disabling illnesses. MDD affects more than 16 percent of adults at some point during their lifetimes. Second-generation antidepressants dominate the medical management of depressive disorders. These drugs include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and other drugs with related mechanisms of action that selectively target neurotransmitters. Objectives: The objective of this report was to compare the benefits and harms of bupropion, citalopram, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, mirtazapine, nefazodone, paroxetine, sertraline, trazodone, and venlafaxine for the treatment of depressive disorders, including variations of effects in patients with accompanying symptoms and patient subgroups. Data Sources: We updated a comparative effectiveness review published in 2007 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality searching PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts up to January 2011. Review Methods: Two people independently reviewed the literature, abstracted data, and rated the risk of bias. If data were sufficient, we conducted meta-analyses of head-to-head trials of the relative benefit of response to treatment. In addition, we conducted mixed treatment comparisons to derive indirect estimates of the comparative efficacy among all second-generation antidepressants. Results: From a total of 3,722 citations, we identified 248 studies of good or fair quality. Overall, no substantial differences in efficacy could be detected among second-generation antidepressants for the treatment of acute-phase MDD. Statistically significant differences in response rates between some drugs are small and likely not clinically relevant. No differences in efficacy were apparent in patients with accompanying symptoms or in subgroups based on age, sex, ethnicity, or comorbidities, although evidence within these subpopulations was limited. Differences exist in the incidence of specific adverse events and the onset of action. Venlafaxine leads to higher rates of nausea and vomiting, sertraline to higher rates of diarrhea, and mirtazapine to higher rates of weight gain than comparator drugs. Bupropion causes lower rates of sexual dysfunction than other antidepressants. The evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the comparative efficacy and effectiveness for the treatment of dysthymia and subsyndromal depression. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the existing evidence does not warrant the choice of one second-generation antidepressant over another based on greater efficacy and effectiveness. Differences with respect to onset of action and adverse events may be taken into consideration for the choice of a medication.

Imaging Techniques for Treatment Evaluation for Metastatic Breast Cancer


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 17 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jun 04, 2014 06:13PM
Description: The purpose of this technical brief is to understand current utilization of metastatic breast imaging modalities for treatment evaluation in the United States, both in order to summarize the current state of the science and to inform future research on this topic.

Benefit of Ubiquinone Supplementation for patients with early Parkinson's disease


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 8 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jul 13, 2014 02:05PM
Description: Clinical trials investigating the effect of coenzyme Q10 in protecting the dopaminergic fibers showed different results . Some trials showed slower progress of the disease associated with supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 . However other trials showed no evidence of benefit . Our study aims at synthesizing the evidence in the effect of Ubiquinone on patients with early Parkinson from clinical trials .

Second-Generation Antidepressants in the Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Depression: An update of the 2007 Comparative Effectiveness Review


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 221 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 2 Extraction Forms,
Date Created: Jul 01, 2014 06:45PM
Description: Background: Depressive disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymia, and subsyndromal depression may be serious disabling illnesses. MDD affects more than 16 percent of adults at some point during their lifetimes. Second-generation antidepressants dominate the medical management of depressive disorders. These drugs include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and other drugs with related mechanisms of action that selectively target neurotransmitters. Objectives: The objective of this report was to compare the benefits and harms of bupropion, citalopram, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, mirtazapine, nefazodone, paroxetine, sertraline, trazodone, and venlafaxine for the treatment of depressive disorders, including variations of effects in patients with accompanying symptoms and patient subgroups. Data Sources: We updated a comparative effectiveness review published in 2007 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality searching PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts up to January 2011. Review Methods: Two people independently reviewed the literature, abstracted data, and rated the risk of bias. If data were sufficient, we conducted meta-analyses of head-to-head trials of the relative benefit of response to treatment. In addition, we conducted mixed treatment comparisons to derive indirect estimates of the comparative efficacy among all second-generation antidepressants. Results: From a total of 3,722 citations, we identified 248 studies of good or fair quality. Overall, no substantial differences in efficacy could be detected among second-generation antidepressants for the treatment of acute-phase MDD. Statistically significant differences in response rates between some drugs are small and likely not clinically relevant. No differences in efficacy were apparent in patients with accompanying symptoms or in subgroups based on age, sex, ethnicity, or comorbidities, although evidence within these subpopulations was limited. Differences exist in the incidence of specific adverse events and the onset of action. Venlafaxine leads to higher rates of nausea and vomiting, sertraline to higher rates of diarrhea, and mirtazapine to higher rates of weight gain than comparator drugs. Bupropion causes lower rates of sexual dysfunction than other antidepressants. The evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the comparative efficacy and effectiveness for the treatment of dysthymia and subsyndromal depression. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the existing evidence does not warrant the choice of one second-generation antidepressant over another based on greater efficacy and effectiveness. Differences with respect to onset of action and adverse events may be taken into consideration for the choice of a medication.

Imaging Techniques for Treatment Evaluation for Metastatic Breast Cancer


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 17 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jun 04, 2014 06:13PM
Description: The purpose of this technical brief is to understand current utilization of metastatic breast imaging modalities for treatment evaluation in the United States, both in order to summarize the current state of the science and to inform future research on this topic.



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The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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