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Review Data Repository
Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.
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Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

Treatment for Bipolar Disorder [entered retrospectively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 191 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jan 26, 2018 01:17AM
Description: Objective. Assess the effect of drug and nondrug interventions for treating acute symptoms associated with bipolar disorder (BD) and preventing relapse. Data sources. Ovid MEDLINE® and PsychInfo, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Ovid Embase® bibliographic databases; hand searches of references of relevant systematic reviews through May, 2017. Review methods. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials and prospective cohorts with comparator arms enrolling adults with BD of any type with 3 weeks followup for acute mania, 3 months for depression, and 6 months for maintenance treatments. We excluded acute mania and depression studies with greater than 50 percent attrition. Results. We synthesized evidence from 181 unique studies, 117 studies for 28 drugs, 64 studies for nondrug interventions. All drug findings with at least low-strength evidence were based on studies almost exclusively enrolling adults with BD-I. Asenapine, cariprazine, quetiapine, and olanzapine improved acute mania symptoms compared to placebo (low-strength evidence). However, improvements were of modest clinical significance, with values that were less than the minimally important difference, but still large enough that a reasonable proportion of participants likely received a benefit. Unpooled evidence indicated an overall beneficial effect of risperidone and ziprasidone on acute mania symptoms compared to placebo (low-strength evidence). Participants using antipsychotics, except quetiapine, reported more extrapyramidal symptoms compared to placebo, and those using olanzapine reported more clinically significant weight gain. Lithium improved acute mania in the short-term and prolonged time to relapse in the long-term compared to placebo (low-strength evidence). No difference was found between olanzapine and divalproex/valproate (low-strength evidence). For drugs not approved for BD, paliperidone also improved acute mania compared to placebo (low-strength evidence), while topiramate and allopurinol showed no benefit (low-strength evidence). Further, lithium improved acute mania better than topiramate, although withdrawals for adverse events were lower for topiramate. Only lithium reached a minimally important difference. All other drug comparisons to placebo or active controls for acute mania, depression, and maintenance had insufficient evidence. For psychosocial interventions, cognitive behavioral training (CBT) was no better for depression or mania symptoms than psychoeducation or other active psychosocial comparators (low-strength evidence). Systematic/collaborative care had no effect on relapse compared to inactive comparators (low-strength evidence). Evidence was insufficient for all other nondrug interventions. Conclusions. We found no high- or moderate-strength evidence for any intervention to effectively treat any phase of any type of BD compared with placebo or an active comparator. Low-strength evidence showed improved mania symptoms for all FDA-approved antipsychotics, except aripiprazole, when compared with placebo for adults with BD-I. Low-strength evidence also showed benefit from lithium for acute mania in the short-term and resulted in longer periods of maintenance versus placebo in adults with BD-I. Participants using atypical antipsychotics, except quetiapine, reported more extrapyramidal symptoms compared with placebo, and those using olanzapine reported more clinically significant weight gain. Evidence was insufficient for most nondrug interventions. Low-strength evidence showed no benefit for CBT on mood symptoms compared with active controls or systematic/collaborative care compared with inactive controls on relapse. Information on harms was limited across all drug and nondrug studies. Future studies of BD treatments will require innovative ways to increase study completion rates.

Blood Pressure Targets in CKD


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 3 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jul 02, 2012 08:35PM
Description: Background: The optimal blood pressure target in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. Purpose: To summarize trials comparing lower versus higher blood pressure targets in adult patients with CKD and focus on proteinuria as an effect modifier.

Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Adults With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): A Systematic Review Update


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 0 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 09, 2018 05:09PM
Description: This systematic review is an update of a 2013 report that evaluated psychological and pharmacological treatments of adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The purpose of this review is to update the earlier work, expand the range of treatments examined, address earlier uncertainties, identify ways to improve care for PTSD patients, and reduce variation in existing treatment guidelines.

Omega-3 fatty acids for adults with depression (Topic 4 in Data Abstraction Assistant [DAA] Trial)


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 0 Studies, 1 Key Question, 0 Extraction Forms,
Date Created: Jun 28, 2018 06:18PM
Description: This SRDR project was created to house the data abstraction forms (as PDFs) for the systematic review on omega-3 fatty acids for adults with depression. This systematic review was used as Topic 4 to identify studies for data abstraction during the Data Abstraction Assistant (DAA) Trial. The DAA Trial is registered with the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) HSRP20152269. Registered November 9, 2015. https://wwwcf.nlm.nih.gov/hsr_project/view_hsrproj_record.cfm?NLMUNIQUE_ID=20152269&SEARCH_FOR=Tianjing%20Li

Interventions to promote physical activity in cancer survivors (Topic 3 in Data Abstraction Assistant [DAA] Trial)


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 0 Studies, 1 Key Question, 0 Extraction Forms,
Date Created: Jun 28, 2018 06:12PM
Description: This SRDR project was created to house the data abstraction forms (as PDFs) for the systematic review on interventions to promote physical activity in cancer survivors. This systematic review was used as Topic 3 to identify studies for data abstraction during the Data Abstraction Assistant (DAA) Trial. The DAA Trial is registered with the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) HSRP20152269. Registered November 9, 2015. https://wwwcf.nlm.nih.gov/hsr_project/view_hsrproj_record.cfm?NLMUNIQUE_ID=20152269&SEARCH_FOR=Tianjing%20Li

Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK-9) antibodies for adults with hypercholesterolemia (Topic 2 in Data Abstraction Assistant [DAA] Trial)


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 0 Studies, 1 Key Question, 0 Extraction Forms,
Date Created: Jun 28, 2018 06:09PM
Description: This SRDR project was created to house the data abstraction forms (as PDFs) for the systematic review on PCSK-9 antibodies for adults with hypercholesterolemia. This systematic review was used as Topic 2 to identify studies for data abstraction during the Data Abstraction Assistant (DAA) Trial. The DAA Trial is registered with the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) HSRP20152269. Registered November 9, 2015. https://wwwcf.nlm.nih.gov/hsr_project/view_hsrproj_record.cfm?NLMUNIQUE_ID=20152269&SEARCH_FOR=Tianjing%20Li



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The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/