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Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.
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Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

SRDR Project Indexing


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 136 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: May 20, 2018 11:24PM
Description: This is a Methods Research project that catalogs the various projects with publicly available data on the SRDR Webpage.

Adverse Effects of Pharmacologic Treatments of Major Depression in Older Adults


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 21 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: May 30, 2019 02:49PM
Description: Objective. To assess select adverse events of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults 65 years old or older. Antidepressants included in this review, as determined by expert opinion, are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), bupropion, mirtazapine, trazodone, vilazodone and vortioxetine. Data sources. MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Central, and PsycINFO bibliographic databases from earliest date through May 15, 2018; hand searches of references of relevant studies; www.clinicaltrials.gov and the International Controlled Trials Registry Platform. Review methods. Two investigators screened abstracts and subsequently reviewed full-text files. We abstracted data, performed meta-analyses when appropriate, assessed the risk of bias of each individual study, and graded the strength of evidence (SOE) for each comparison and select outcomes. Number needed to harm (NNH) is reported for graded outcomes with statistically significant findings. Results. Nineteen RCTs and two observational studies reported in 41 articles were included. Studies mostly evaluated treatment of the acute phase (<12 weeks) of MDD which was of moderate severity in patients 65 years and older, required subjects to be free from uncontrolled medical comorbidities or psychological conditions, and relied on spontaneous reporting of adverse events. Evidence was scarce and conclusions (based on statistical significance) for a given comparison and outcome are based often on a single study; particularly for specific adverse events. None of the RCTs were powered or designed to capture adverse events and most RCTs studied low doses of antidepressants. Observational data were limited by residual confounding. SSRIs (escitalopram and fluoxetine, moderate SOE), vortioxetine (high SOE) and bupropion XR (moderate SOE) led to a statistically similar frequency of adverse events compared with placebo; whereas SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) were found to cause a greater number of adverse events (high SOE, NNH 10) compared with placebo during treatment of the acute phase of MDD. Both SSRIs (citalopram, escitalopram and fluoxetine) and SNRIs caused a greater number of withdrawals due to adverse events compared with placebo (SSRIs low SOE, NNH 11; SNRIs moderate SOE, NNH 17). Duloxetine led to a greater number of falls compared with placebo (moderate SOE, NNH 10) during 24 weeks treatment. A single observational study provided evidence on long term use of antidepressants (low SOE) and suggested increased risk of adverse events (SSRIs), falls (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine, trazadone), fractures (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine), and mortality (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine, trazadone), compared to no antidepressant. Evidence for the comparative harms of different antidepressants was limited to single RCTs mostly studying treatment of the acute phase of MDD (<12 weeks). Comparing SSRIs to each other or SSRIs to SNRIs showed statistically similar rates of adverse events (moderate SOE). SSRIs (paroxetine, citalopram, sertraline) had fewer withdrawals due to adverse events compared with TCAs (amitriptyline or nortriptyline) (low SOE, NNT 13) as did mirtazapine compared with paroxetine (low SOE, NNT 9). Vortioxetine had fewer adverse events compared with duloxetine (high SOE, NNT 6 ). Increasing age was associated with greater incidence of serious adverse events with escitalopram (low SOE). The increased risk of falls on duloxetine may be associated with the presence of cardiopulmonary conditions (low SOE). Conclusions. In patients 65 years of age or older with MDD, treatment of the acute phase of MDD with SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) led to a greater number of adverse events compared with placebo while adverse events were statistically similar to placebo with SSRIs (escitalopram, fluoxetine), vortioxetine and bupropion. SSRIs (citalopram, escitalopram and fluoxetine) and SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) led to a greater number of study withdrawals due to adverse events compared with placebo and duloxetine increased the risk of falls. Further characterization of the comparative safety of antidepressants is difficult because few studies were identified, comparisons were based on statistical significance, trials were not powered to identify small difference in adverse events and observational studies may be confounded. Comparative, long-term, well-designed studies that report specific adverse events are needed to better inform decisionmaking in this population.

Diet-Related Fibers and Human Health Outcomes, Version 5.0


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 1156 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Apr 09, 2019 01:09AM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 10 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest. This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.

Adverse Effects of Pharmacologic Treatments of Major Depression in Older Adults


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 21 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: May 30, 2019 02:49PM
Description: Objective. To assess select adverse events of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults 65 years old or older. Antidepressants included in this review, as determined by expert opinion, are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), bupropion, mirtazapine, trazodone, vilazodone and vortioxetine. Data sources. MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Central, and PsycINFO bibliographic databases from earliest date through May 15, 2018; hand searches of references of relevant studies; www.clinicaltrials.gov and the International Controlled Trials Registry Platform. Review methods. Two investigators screened abstracts and subsequently reviewed full-text files. We abstracted data, performed meta-analyses when appropriate, assessed the risk of bias of each individual study, and graded the strength of evidence (SOE) for each comparison and select outcomes. Number needed to harm (NNH) is reported for graded outcomes with statistically significant findings. Results. Nineteen RCTs and two observational studies reported in 41 articles were included. Studies mostly evaluated treatment of the acute phase (<12 weeks) of MDD which was of moderate severity in patients 65 years and older, required subjects to be free from uncontrolled medical comorbidities or psychological conditions, and relied on spontaneous reporting of adverse events. Evidence was scarce and conclusions (based on statistical significance) for a given comparison and outcome are based often on a single study; particularly for specific adverse events. None of the RCTs were powered or designed to capture adverse events and most RCTs studied low doses of antidepressants. Observational data were limited by residual confounding. SSRIs (escitalopram and fluoxetine, moderate SOE), vortioxetine (high SOE) and bupropion XR (moderate SOE) led to a statistically similar frequency of adverse events compared with placebo; whereas SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) were found to cause a greater number of adverse events (high SOE, NNH 10) compared with placebo during treatment of the acute phase of MDD. Both SSRIs (citalopram, escitalopram and fluoxetine) and SNRIs caused a greater number of withdrawals due to adverse events compared with placebo (SSRIs low SOE, NNH 11; SNRIs moderate SOE, NNH 17). Duloxetine led to a greater number of falls compared with placebo (moderate SOE, NNH 10) during 24 weeks treatment. A single observational study provided evidence on long term use of antidepressants (low SOE) and suggested increased risk of adverse events (SSRIs), falls (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine, trazadone), fractures (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine), and mortality (SSRIs, SNRI venlafaxine, mirtazapine, trazadone), compared to no antidepressant. Evidence for the comparative harms of different antidepressants was limited to single RCTs mostly studying treatment of the acute phase of MDD (<12 weeks). Comparing SSRIs to each other or SSRIs to SNRIs showed statistically similar rates of adverse events (moderate SOE). SSRIs (paroxetine, citalopram, sertraline) had fewer withdrawals due to adverse events compared with TCAs (amitriptyline or nortriptyline) (low SOE, NNT 13) as did mirtazapine compared with paroxetine (low SOE, NNT 9). Vortioxetine had fewer adverse events compared with duloxetine (high SOE, NNT 6 ). Increasing age was associated with greater incidence of serious adverse events with escitalopram (low SOE). The increased risk of falls on duloxetine may be associated with the presence of cardiopulmonary conditions (low SOE). Conclusions. In patients 65 years of age or older with MDD, treatment of the acute phase of MDD with SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) led to a greater number of adverse events compared with placebo while adverse events were statistically similar to placebo with SSRIs (escitalopram, fluoxetine), vortioxetine and bupropion. SSRIs (citalopram, escitalopram and fluoxetine) and SNRIs (duloxetine and venlafaxine) led to a greater number of study withdrawals due to adverse events compared with placebo and duloxetine increased the risk of falls. Further characterization of the comparative safety of antidepressants is difficult because few studies were identified, comparisons were based on statistical significance, trials were not powered to identify small difference in adverse events and observational studies may be confounded. Comparative, long-term, well-designed studies that report specific adverse events are needed to better inform decisionmaking in this population.

Diet-Related Fibers and Human Health Outcomes, Version 5.0


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 1156 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Apr 09, 2019 01:09AM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 10 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest. This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.

Management of Infertility


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 151 Studies, 7 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Jan 09, 2019 05:11PM
Description: Objective. Previous studies have demonstrated varying success for treatment of infertility. Much of this literature however does not focus on treatment of women with specific diagnoses. This systematic review evaluated the comparative effectiveness and safety of fertility treatment strategies for (a) women of reproductive age (18-44) who are infertile due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, unknown reasons, or tubal or peritoneal factors or (b) couples with male factor infertility; and evaluated short- and long-term health outcomes of gamete donors in infertility. Data sources. We searched PubMed®, Embase®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for English-language studies published from January 1, 2007, to October 3, 2018, that reported live birth rates, pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, time to pregnancy, and short-term and long-term adverse outcomes for mothers and children born after infertility treatment. For male and female donors, we searched for studies reporting short- and long-term adverse effects and quality-of-life outcomes. Review methods. Two investigators screened each abstract and full-text article for inclusion; abstracted data; and performed quality ratings, applicability ratings, and evidence grading. Where appropriate, random-effects models were used to compute summary estimates of effects.



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The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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