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Review Data Repository
Welcome to the Systematic Review Data Repository
The Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for the extraction and management of data for systematic review or meta-analysis. It is also an open and searchable archive of systematic reviews and their data.
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Recently Completed and Deposited Reports Data

SRDR Project Indexing


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 159 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: May 20, 2018 11:24PM
Description: This is a Methods Research project that catalogs the various projects with publicly available data on the SRDR Webpage.

Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 175 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 09, 2020 05:49PM
Description: To assess the effectiveness and harms of opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain; alternative opioid dosing strategies; and risk mitigation strategies

Screening for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adolescents and Adults: A Systematic Review Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Entered Retrospectively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 94 Studies, 9 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 05, 2020 08:41PM
Description: Background: Prior reviews on hepatitis C (HCV) infection screening and treatment used by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to inform its 2013 recommendation found interferon-containing antiviral therapies associated with sustained virologic response (SVR) rates of 68 percent to 78 percent and an association between SVR after antiviral therapy and improved clinical outcomes. Interferon-containing regimens were associated with a high rate of harms. Since the prior reviews, interferon-containing antiviral therapies have been replaced by all-oral direct acting antiviral (DAA) regimens. Purpose: To systematically review the evidence on screening for HCV infection in asymptomatic adults and adolescents, including effects of DAA regimens and interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Data Sources: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Ovid MEDLINE and ClinicalTrials.gov through February 2019, manually reviewed reference lists, and conducted literature surveillance through November 22, 2019. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomized trials, and cohort studies of HCV screening, antiviral therapy, and interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HCV infection on SVR and clinical outcomes; and cohort studies on the association between an SVR after antiviral therapy versus no SVR and clinical outcomes. Treatment studies focused on populations without cirrhosis who are more likely to be asymptomatic and identified by screening. Data Extraction: One investigator abstracted data, and a second investigator checked data abstraction for accuracy. Two investigators independently assessed study quality using methods developed by the USPSTF. Data Synthesis (Results): No study evaluated the benefits of HCV screening versus no screening, or the yield of repeat versus one-time screening. Previously reviewed studies found that HCV screening might be associated with negative psychological and social consequences, but had important methodological limitations; no new studies were identified. One new study found similar diagnostic yield of risk-based and birth cohort screening, but it was retrospective and assumed perfect implementation of risk-based screening. Ten trials reported improvements in some quality of life and functional outcomes following DAA treatment compared with prior to treatment, but differences were small, studies were open-label, and there was no non-DAA comparison group. Forty-nine trials found DAA regimens associated with pooled SVR rates that ranged from 95.5 percent to 98.9 percent across genotypes; rates of serious adverse events (1.9%) and withdrawal due to adverse events (0.4%) were low. Seven trials reported SVR rates in adolescents with DAA therapy similar to those observed in adults. An SVR after antiviral therapy was associated with decreased risk of all-cause mortality (13 studies, pooled hazard ratio [HR] 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28 to 0.56), liver mortality (4 studies, pooled HR 0.11, 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.27), cirrhosis (4 cohorts in 3 studies, pooled HR 0.36, 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.40), and hepatocellular carcinoma (20 studies, pooled HR 0.29, 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.38) versus no SVR, after adjustment for potential confounders. New evidence on interventions to reduce the risk of mother-to-infant transmission was limited and did not change the conclusion from the prior review that no intervention has been clearly demonstrated to reduce risk. Limitations: Most DAA trials were not randomized and did not have a non-DAA comparison group, almost all DAA trials relied on SVR as the main efficacy outcome, observational studies varied in how well they adjusted for confounders, and few studies evaluated the effectiveness of DAA regimens in adolescents. Conclusions: The USPSTF previously determined that HCV screening is highly accurate. Currently recommended all-oral DAA regimens are associated with very high SVR rates (95.5% to 98.9% across genotypes) and few harms relative to older antiviral therapies. An SVR after antiviral therapy is associated with improved clinical outcomes compared with no SVR, after adjusting for potential confounders. Direct evidence on the benefits of HCV screening remains unavailable, and direct evidence on the effects of antiviral therapy on clinical outcomes remains limited but indicates improved long-term outcomes.

Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 175 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 09, 2020 05:49PM
Description: To assess the effectiveness and harms of opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain; alternative opioid dosing strategies; and risk mitigation strategies

Screening for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adolescents and Adults: A Systematic Review Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Entered Retrospectively]


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 94 Studies, 9 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Mar 05, 2020 08:41PM
Description: Background: Prior reviews on hepatitis C (HCV) infection screening and treatment used by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to inform its 2013 recommendation found interferon-containing antiviral therapies associated with sustained virologic response (SVR) rates of 68 percent to 78 percent and an association between SVR after antiviral therapy and improved clinical outcomes. Interferon-containing regimens were associated with a high rate of harms. Since the prior reviews, interferon-containing antiviral therapies have been replaced by all-oral direct acting antiviral (DAA) regimens. Purpose: To systematically review the evidence on screening for HCV infection in asymptomatic adults and adolescents, including effects of DAA regimens and interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Data Sources: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Ovid MEDLINE and ClinicalTrials.gov through February 2019, manually reviewed reference lists, and conducted literature surveillance through November 22, 2019. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomized trials, and cohort studies of HCV screening, antiviral therapy, and interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HCV infection on SVR and clinical outcomes; and cohort studies on the association between an SVR after antiviral therapy versus no SVR and clinical outcomes. Treatment studies focused on populations without cirrhosis who are more likely to be asymptomatic and identified by screening. Data Extraction: One investigator abstracted data, and a second investigator checked data abstraction for accuracy. Two investigators independently assessed study quality using methods developed by the USPSTF. Data Synthesis (Results): No study evaluated the benefits of HCV screening versus no screening, or the yield of repeat versus one-time screening. Previously reviewed studies found that HCV screening might be associated with negative psychological and social consequences, but had important methodological limitations; no new studies were identified. One new study found similar diagnostic yield of risk-based and birth cohort screening, but it was retrospective and assumed perfect implementation of risk-based screening. Ten trials reported improvements in some quality of life and functional outcomes following DAA treatment compared with prior to treatment, but differences were small, studies were open-label, and there was no non-DAA comparison group. Forty-nine trials found DAA regimens associated with pooled SVR rates that ranged from 95.5 percent to 98.9 percent across genotypes; rates of serious adverse events (1.9%) and withdrawal due to adverse events (0.4%) were low. Seven trials reported SVR rates in adolescents with DAA therapy similar to those observed in adults. An SVR after antiviral therapy was associated with decreased risk of all-cause mortality (13 studies, pooled hazard ratio [HR] 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28 to 0.56), liver mortality (4 studies, pooled HR 0.11, 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.27), cirrhosis (4 cohorts in 3 studies, pooled HR 0.36, 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.40), and hepatocellular carcinoma (20 studies, pooled HR 0.29, 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.38) versus no SVR, after adjustment for potential confounders. New evidence on interventions to reduce the risk of mother-to-infant transmission was limited and did not change the conclusion from the prior review that no intervention has been clearly demonstrated to reduce risk. Limitations: Most DAA trials were not randomized and did not have a non-DAA comparison group, almost all DAA trials relied on SVR as the main efficacy outcome, observational studies varied in how well they adjusted for confounders, and few studies evaluated the effectiveness of DAA regimens in adolescents. Conclusions: The USPSTF previously determined that HCV screening is highly accurate. Currently recommended all-oral DAA regimens are associated with very high SVR rates (95.5% to 98.9% across genotypes) and few harms relative to older antiviral therapies. An SVR after antiviral therapy is associated with improved clinical outcomes compared with no SVR, after adjusting for potential confounders. Direct evidence on the benefits of HCV screening remains unavailable, and direct evidence on the effects of antiviral therapy on clinical outcomes remains limited but indicates improved long-term outcomes.

Maternal and Fetal Effects of Mental Health Treatments in Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women: A Systematic Review of Pharmacological Interventions


Public Report Complete
Statistics: 141 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Created: Feb 06, 2020 03:08PM
Description: A systematic review to assess the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of pharmacological interventions for pregnant and postpartum women with psychiatric disorders.



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The data contained in this project are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits the use, dissemination, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and that the use is non-commercial and otherwise in compliance with the license. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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