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Study Title and Description

Effect of caffeine on leg muscle pain during cycling exercise among females.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Effect of caffeine on leg muscle pain during cycling exercise among females.
Author RW Motl,PJ O'connor,L Tubandt,T Puetz,MR Ely,
Country
Year 2006
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? The present experiment examined the effect of two doses of caffeine on naturally occurring quadriceps muscle pain during submaximal cycling exercise among females.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Participants (N = 11) were female nonsmoking college students of average body weight who reported low daily caffeine consumption (i.e., </= 100 mg/day) and no hypersensitivity to caffeine. Only nonsmokers of average body weight (i.e., body mass index (BMI) </- 25) were recruited. Women on oral contraceptives were not tested. The participants reported that they did not take any pain or antidepressant medication. Participants performed an incremental exercise test on an electronically braked, computer-driven cycle ergometer (Lode BV, Groningen, The Netherlands) to measure peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak ). Heart rate was continuously displayed using a Polar Vantage XL heart rate monitor (Polar Electro Oy, Kempele, Finland). Heart rate was recorded during the last 10 s of every minute during the test of peak oxygen consumption. Participants completed 1 d of preliminary testing and 3 d of experimental testing. The 3 d of experimental testing were separated by 1–2 wk, and generally coincided with the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, although the exact phase was not confirmed based on hormonal measures. Experimental testing was conducted in the morning (0700 h +/- 30 min). Before the experimental testing, participants were asked to abstain from (a) caffeine consumption for 1 wk; (b) alcohol consumption for 24 h; and (c) eating and exercising for 12 h. On the preliminary testing day, the participants completed a 7-d caffeine recall questionnaire and a medical history questionnaire. The medical history was used to identify contraindications to caffeine consumption and exercise testing, and those individuals with contraindications to caffeine consumption and exercise testing were excluded from participation. We further excluded participants with current pain and those who were taking pain or antidepressant medications. On experimental days, the participant ingested capsules that contained one of two doses of caffeine (5 or 10 mg/kg body weight) or placebo with approximately 500 mL of water. The participants then sat and read quietly in a sound-dampened, thermoneutral environmental chamber. One hour after ingesting the capsules, the participant walked to another room and performed 30 min of cycling on an ergometer at an intensity of approximately 60% V˙ O2peak. The participant’s heart rate and systolic blood pressure were recorded every 5 min during the submaximal exercise bouts. Systolic blood pressure was measured using previously described methods. The two doses of caffeine (Caffeine Anhydrous, USP/NF, Gallipot, St. Paul, MN) and the placebo were delivered in gelatin capsules (No. 1, Eli Lilly & Company, Indianapolis, IN) that were prepared by an independent investigator. The dose of placebo was an equal number of gelatin capsules containing white, all-purpose flour, and the amount of flour (<500 mg). The capsules containing caffeine or placebo were indiscernible in appearance. Caffeine was administered using a double-blind procedure to protect against possible subject and experimenter expectancy effects. The order of drug administration was counterbalanced. Data Analysis Descriptive statistics for the 11 participants are presented in text and tables as mean +/- SD and in figures as mean +/- SEM. The heart rate and systolic blood pressure data recorded during exercise were analyzed with 3 (drug: 10 mg/kg body weight caffeine, 5 mg/kg body weight caffeine, and placebo) x 6 (time: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min) repeated-measures ANOVA based on the univariate F -statistic. The familywise error rate was controlled using the Bonferroni adjustment when tests of simple effects were conducted.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 2
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Blood pressure (SBP)
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2 Heart rate
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description Heart rate was measured using a Polar Vantage XL heart rate monitor (Polar Electro Oy, Kempele, Finland). Systolic blood pressure was measured using previously described methods.
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Subjects served as their own controls (placebo)
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) None
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What conflicts of interest were reported? No information provided
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Refid 16540851
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What were the sources of funding? No information provided
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.