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Study Title and Description

The effects of caffeine in women during aerobic-dance bench stepping.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title The effects of caffeine in women during aerobic-dance bench stepping.
Author JN Ahrens,LK Lloyd,SH Crixell,JL Walker,
Country
Year 2007
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of caffeine ingestion on physiological responses and RPE during aerobic-dance bench stepping (ADBS) in recreationally active women.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Subjects Twenty women, 19–28 years of age, enrolled in a personal fitness and wellness aerobic class at a university participated in this study. To ensure that the subjects were able to follow a videotaped routine and also to reduce the risk of injury, the criteria for subject participation included a minimum of 1 mo of regular attendance (at least 3 d/wk) in formal ADBS classes. The aerobic-fitness levels of the participants ranged from poor to good, according to measurements of their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Based on analysis of their 3-day dietary recalls, 7 consumed no caffeine and 13 consumed no more than 80 mg of caffeine per day; thus, none of the subjects were considered regular caffeine users. Therefore, this sample can be generalized to women of varying fitness levels who are not regular caffeine users and are familiar with the techniques required for ADBS. Testing Procedures Subjects visited the laboratory on 4 separate occasions, 2–7 d apart. During visit 1, they were measured for height and weight (in exercise clothes, without shoes) using a calibrated physicianʼ s scale (Detecto Scale Co., Jericho, NY), and performed a Bruce graded maximal exercise test on a Trackmaster treadmill (FullVision, Newton, KS). During maximal and submaximal exercise tests, each subjectʼ s HR was measured with a Polar Vantage XL telemetric HR monitor (Stanford, CT). HR was recorded at the end of each minute. During visit 1, subjects were instructed to record their usual dietary intake for 3 d. Subjects were instructed to replicate their usual intake on the day before each remaining trial. In addition, they were instructed to prepare for each trial by abstaining from caffeine for 12 h and eating as they normally would before a bout of exercise, including a light snack 1–2 h before each trial. Before visits 2–4, capsules were prepared and placed in coded envelopes by a person who was not involved in the data analysis. Capsules contained anhydrous caffeine powder (Spectrum Chemicals, New Brunswick, NJ) or a similar volume of dextrose (Spectrum Chemicals, New Brunswick, NJ), which had the same color and texture as the caffeine. During visits 2–4, subjects were randomly administered caffeine (3 or 6 mg/kg) or placebo in a double-blind manner. Capsules were consumed with an 8-oz serving of water. After 60 min, subjects followed a previously videotaped, 8-min, submaximal ADBS routine, stepping up and off an 8-in bench at a cadence of 128 beats/min. Trials were separated by a minimum of 48 h. Statistical Analysis The physiological measurements (i.e., oxygen consumption [VO2], carbon dioxide production [VCO2], minute ventilation [VE], respiratory-exchange ratio [RER], rate of energy expenditure [REE], % of maximal oxygen-uptake reserve [%VO2R], and heart rate [HR]) and rating of perceived exhaustion (RPE) recorded at the end of minutes 6, 7, and 8 were averaged and used for data analysis. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures were conducted to determine the effect of different doses of caffeine (placebo vs. 3 mg/kg vs. 6 mg/kg) on the measurements.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description HR was measured with a Polar Vantage XL telemetric HR monitor (Stanford, CT).
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Placebo controls
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) None
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What conflicts of interest were reported? No information provided
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Refid 17460331
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What were the sources of funding? This research was completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the primary authorʼs master of education degree in exercise science at Texas State University-San Marcos.
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.