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Study Title and Description

Caffeine-induced changes in cardiovascular function during resistance training.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Caffeine-induced changes in cardiovascular function during resistance training.
Author TA Astorino,RL Rohmann,K Firth,S Kelly,
Country
Year 2007
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? The primary aim of our study was to examine changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and other cardiovascular variables during fatiguing upper and lower body resistance training after ingestion of 6 mg/kg caffeine or placebo.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Design: Treatment order (caffeine or placebo) was randomly assigned to subjects. A double-blind crossover design was used, so neither investigators nor subjects were aware of the treatment order. Trials were separated by 1 week to minimize subject fatigue. Subjects: Twenty-two normotensive resistance-trained men participated in the study. They completed total-body resistance training a minimum of 2 d/wk and had been training for 6.0 ± 2.7 y. Pre-exercise Measurements: Subjects’ height, weight, and percentage body fat were initially assessed. HR and BP were obtained by telemetry (Polar Electro, Woodbury, NY) and manual sphygmomanometry (adult Tru-Gage cuff, Omron HealthCare Inc., Vernon Hills, IL), respectively, by the primary investigator after the subjects had been seated for approximately 5 min. The first and fourth Korotkoff sounds were recorded to indicate systolic and diastolic BP. Test–retest correlations for resting and exercise BP were 0.98 and 0.93, respectively. Exercise Protocol: Subjects warmed up on a commercial upright stationary bike for 5 min. Measurements of HR and BP were recorded at 4 min. Then, subjects completed a warm-up set of 12–15 repetitions on a standard barbell bench press at a load ranging from 45 to 60 kg. During both the caffeine and the placebo trials, 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) was determined according to standard methods (3). Two minutes of rest were allotted between sets, and 1-RM was determined in 3–6 sets. 1-RM represented the maximum weight a participant could lift once with proper form. Subjects were given verbal encouragement throughout the protocol. Immediately after 1-RM determination, 60% of the 1-RM determined in both the caffeine and the placebo trials was placed on the bar, and subjects completed repetitions to failure. HR was recorded immediately after exercise, followed by systolic and diastolic BP assessment with subjects in a seated position approximately 10 s after exercise. For bench-press exercise, subjects were bothered by the arm cuff during exercise, so the tester immediately placed it on the arm and took the measurement once exercise was terminated. During leg-press exercise, the cuff remained on the arm throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure and rate-pressure product (RPP) were calculated using standard equations. After bench-press exercise, subjects completed the same protocol on a 45° plate-loaded leg-press sled. Subjects returned 1 wk later and repeated the identical protocol after ingesting the other treatment. After Trial 2, they filled out an inventory of side effects and symptoms that contained questions regarding their health status, as well as asking whether they could identify the caffeine trial.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 4
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2 Blood pressure
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3 Rate pressure product
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4 Mean arterial pressure
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description Heart rate and blood pressure were obtained by telemetry (Polar Electro, Woodbury, NY) and manual sphygmomanometry (adult Tru-Gage cuff, Omron HealthCare Inc., Vernon Hills, IL), respectively, by the primary investigator after the subjects had been seated for approximately 5 min. The first and fourth Korotkoff sounds were recorded to indicate systolic and diastolic blood pressure.
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Subjects served as their own control.
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) None.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? None were reported.
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Refid 18046056
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What were the sources of funding? No external funding was used for the project.
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.