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Study Title and Description

Investigations on the effect of caffeine on cerebral venous vessel contrast by using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) at 1.5, 3 and 7 T.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Investigations on the effect of caffeine on cerebral venous vessel contrast by using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) at 1.5, 3 and 7 T.
Author J Sedlacik,K Helm,A Rauscher,J Stadler,HJ Mentzel,JR Reichenbach,
Country
Year 2008
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? The aims of this study were to demonstrate the sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to caffeine-induced changes in cerebral blood flow and to investigate the time course and magnitude of signal change in caffeine-habituated and -abstinent volunteers.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Subjects: Two groups of healthy subjects were investigated. The first group (6 females, 6 males, mean age=25.0±2.9 years, mean body mass=69±15 kg) consisted of coffee drinkers with a consumption of more than 200 mg of caffeine per day; the second group (7 females, 8 males, mean age=24.1±3.3 years, mean body mass=72±9 kg) consisted of abstinent volunteers. Caffeine users were asked to have their last cup of coffee in the morning, i.e. 5–7 h before the experiment in order to avoid withdrawal symptoms or an accumulation of caffeine. A tablet (Coffeinum N 0.2 g; Merck dura GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany) containing 200 mg of caffeine was dissolved in 100 ml of water and applied orally by a tube, while the subjects remained in measuring position inside the scanner during the whole experiment. Four volunteers of each group were re-scanned within a few weeks with a dose of 100 mg of caffeine. One abstinent volunteer was additionally scanned with a dose of only 50 mg of caffeine. In this volunteer, the effects of 200 mg of caffeine were also investigated at 3 and 7 T. These measurements were performed over a time period of several weeks to avoid any caffeine habituation of the volunteer Data acquisition: Susceptibility-weighted data of all volunteers were acquired on a 1.5 T MR system (MAGNETOM Vision; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). Following a native SWI scan, caffeine was applied as described without having the subjects change their position and the same scan was repeated multiple times up to 1 h with the same sequence parameters, receiver gain and shim currents. During this time course of the SWI acquisition, two additional anatomical 3D MP-RAGE scans were interspersed for each volunteer. The acquisition time was 5 min for each MP-RAGE scan. Since the order of these two anatomical scans was randomly selected during the total imaging session, the time intervals between two SWI (susceptibility-weighted imaging) acquisitions were not strictly constant, but varied slightly between the volunteers. Unless not desired by the volunteer, the anatomical scans were screened by a senior radiologist for evidence of cerebral pathology.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Cerebral blood flow.
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? NCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description Susceptibility-weighted data of all volunteers were acquired on a 1.5 T MR system (MAGNETOM Vision; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany).
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Individuals served as their own controls, i.e., they each have a baseline (or native) scan prior to consuming caffeine.
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) Unless not desired by the volunteer, the anatomical scans were screened by the radiologist for evidence of cerebral pathology.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? Conflicts of interest were not mentioned by the authors.
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Refid 18226553
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What were the sources of funding? This study was partly funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) (grant no. RE 1123/7-1&2) and the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) Jena (01ZZ0405). Katharina Helm was supported by a young investigator fellowship granted by the IZKF Jena.
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.