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Study Title and Description

Effects of caffeine and aspirin on light resistance training performance, perceived exertion, and pain perception.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Effects of caffeine and aspirin on light resistance training performance, perceived exertion, and pain perception.
Author GM Hudson,JM Green,PA Bishop,MT Richardson,
Country
Year 2008
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? This study compared independent effects of caffeine and aspirin on muscular endurance (repetitions), heart rate (HR), perceived exertion (RPE), and perceived pain index (PPI) during light resistance training bouts performed to volitional failure.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Experimental approach: The study was a within-subjects, double-blind design. Treatment trials (caffeine, placebo, aspirin) were counterbalanced to account for ordering effects. To begin the initial testing session, each participant’s age (years) was recorded, and height (cm) and weight (kg) were measured. The following three sessions were the treatment trials where each participant ingested either a dose of caffeine (6–6.4 mg/kg), aspirin (10–10.4 mg/kg), or a dextrose placebo with 500 ml of water 1 hour before testing. This dosage of caffeine was chosen because it has shown to elicit the maximum ergogenic effect per milligram of caffeine while still remaining within the legal limits of the International Olympic Committee. Each substance was contained in identical pills prepared at a local pharmacy. Dextrose served as a diluent to top off each supplement. After the initial testing session, the treatment dosage was assigned to each participant according to his weight, and the treatments given to each participant were counterbalanced. Procedures: Heart rate and PPI were also recorded before and after each set. Heart rate, PPI, and RPE were recorded, in thatorder, within 10 seconds after completing each set. Finally, HR, PPI, and RPE were recorded 5 minutes after the completion of the exercise. This same procedure was then followed for AC. On completion of both exercises, a questionnaire was given to the participant to determine different symptoms that the participant may have experienced as a result of consuming the supplements. All trials (placebo, aspirin, and caffeine) were conducted in the same manner, except for the specific supplement ingested.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate.
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description Heart rate was evaluated with subjects wearing a Cardiosport(Deer Park, NY) heart rate monitor.
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Treatment trials were caffeine, aspirin, or placebo, with each subject receiving each treatment eventually.
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) Overweight individuals and smokers were also excluded because smoking and an abnormal body weight affect caffeine metabolism. To minimize adverse reactions to caffeine, participants had to report a moderate daily caffeine intake (~100–400 mg) and be free of symptoms (self-reported) of caffeine hypersensitivity. Performance data (repetitions, RPE, PPI, and HR) and subjective responses were analyzed for each variable using 3 (trial) x 4 (set) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a least significant difference post hoc procedure using SPSS 14.0 software. A Bonferroni post hoc was performed on the first set of each exercise.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? Conflicts of interest were not mentioned.
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Refid 18824931
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What were the sources of funding? The supplements for this study were funded by a research grant from the Graduate Student Association of the University of Alabama.
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.