Advanced Search

Study Preview



Study Title and Description

Caffeinated coffee enhances co-operative behavior in the Mixed Motive Game in healthy volunteers.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |

Primary Publication Information
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
TitleData
Title Caffeinated coffee enhances co-operative behavior in the Mixed Motive Game in healthy volunteers.
Author WS Tse,CC Chan,SY Shiu,PY Chung,SH Cheng,
Country
Year 2009
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? The present study examined the effects of caffeinated coffee on antidepressant-related co-operative behavior.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Participants: Seventy-seven university students (35 males and 42 females) who were low-caffeine users (< 200 mg/day about two cups of coffee/day. The daily consumption of caffeine was estimated based on self-report of daily intakes of coffee, tea, caffeinated sodas, and other dietary sources. The participants’ age ranged from 18 to 24 years (mean, 20.38 ± 1.28 years). They were randomly assigned to either one of two treatment order groups: (i) caffeinated coffee then decaffeinated coffee treatment group; or (ii) decaffeinated coffee then caffeinated coffee treatment group (caffeinated coffee then decaffeinated coffee treatment group – 18 males, 22 females and decaffeinated coffee then caffeinated coffee treatment group – 17 males, 20 females). Materials: The Panasonic EW3106 Diagnostec Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor was used to measure the heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure of the participants. Design and drugs: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of caffeinated coffee versus decaffeinated coffee was conducted. Caffeinated coffee (150 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee (9 mg caffeine) were dissolved each in 200 ml of warm water without sugar or milk. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive either caffeinated coffee or decaffeinated coffee first. The two sessions were separated by a washout period of at least 3 days. The time period for the imagination task and Mixed Motive Game was chosen to coincide with the maximum level of salivary caffeine, which is reported to peak at 42 ± 5 min post-coffee consumption. Procedure: The study was approved by the University Ethics Committee. Upon arrival, all participants gave written informed consent. One day before the experiment, the participants were instructed not to consume any caffeine-containing food/drinks, as well as other regular food after 9:00 pm. All the experimental sessions were conducted between 9:00 am and 12:00 pm. At baseline, participants filled in the 2-week version of PANAS. They rested for 5 min before having their heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressures measured. They filled out the state version of the PANAS and the SRQ. At 45 min after coffee consumption, the participants filled out the state version of PANAS and SRQ again, and their blood pressure and heart rate were once again measured. The participants were then instructed to imagine a fictitious person using gender-matched tape recording. After the completion of the imagination task, they indicated the social characters of the fictitious person using the 2DSIS. They were then given instructions for the Mixed Motive Game and were instructed to play the game with the fictitious person, whom they had just imagined. Upon completion of the Mixed Motive Game, the participants completed the PES to indicate their level of rejection towards the fictitious person. At the end of each session, they were asked if they know which type of coffee they had consumed.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 2
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately). 2 Blood pressure
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).3
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).4
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).5
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).6
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the study design? Controlled Trial
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Optional: Name of Method or short description The Panasonic EW3106 Diagnostec Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor was used to measure the heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure of the participants.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Caffeine (general)
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other? Coffee
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Measured or self reported? Measured
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Subjects served as their own controls. Decaffeinated coffee was control substance (contained 9 mg caffeine).
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) The results were analyzed using SPSS. To evaluate the effects of caffeinated coffee on state mood as well as on psychological and physiological parameters (i.e., heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure), the two baseline measurements at the beginning of each treatment period were used as covariates. Analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) for cross-over trials was performed as recommended by Senn. Treatment by order interaction was evaluated as suggested by Hills and Armitage. The effects of caffeinated coffee on social behavior as well as the reactions of the subjects toward the fictitious person (as measured by the PES) and the personal characteristics of the person (as measured by the 2DSIS) were analyzed according to the recommendation of Hill and Armitage in order to minimize period effects. Because coffee may induce positive moods and influence the social behavior and perception of the fictitious person, post-coffee treatment positive mood ratings were used as covariates. The estimated marginal means adjusted for the co-variate during decaffeinated coffee and caffeinated coffee consumptions were reported.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What conflicts of interest were reported? Not discussed in the paper.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Refid 19178788
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the sources of funding? Not discussed in the paper.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |




Results & Comparisons

No Results found.