Advanced Search

Study Preview



Study Title and Description

Detrimental effects of energy drink consumption on platelet and endothelial function.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |

Primary Publication Information
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
TitleData
Title Detrimental effects of energy drink consumption on platelet and endothelial function.
Author MI Worthley,A Prabhu,P De Sciscio,C Schultz,P Sanders,SR Willoughby,
Country
Year 2010
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? Energy drink consumption has been anecdotally linked with sudden cardiac death and, more recently, myocardial infarction. As myocardial infarction is strongly associated with both platelet and endothelial dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that energy drink consumption alters platelet and endothelial function.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Study population: Fifty healthy subjects (34 male, aged 22 years +/-2 years) participated in this study. Subjects were included if they consumed energy drinks infrequently (<1 drink per month) and had no documented coronary artery disease and no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Study protocol: All subjects fasted overnight and abstained from any form of energy drink consumption, caffeinated products, and alcohol for at least 7 days before testing. Following 30 minutes of rest, subjects had either venous blood samples taken for the determination of platelet function or endothelial function testing. Subjects then consumed either a 250-mL sugar-free energy drink (1 can) containing caffeine (80 mg), taurine (1000 mg), and glucouronolactone (600 mg), or 250 mL carbonated water (control). The sugar-free version of the energy drink was chosen due to the known effects of glucose on platelet function and nitric oxide bioavailability. Platelet function and endothelial function testing was repeated 60 minutes after ingestion. Hemodynamic measurements (blood pressure and heart rate) were recorded at all time points. Platelet function studies: Blood samples were obtained via venipuncture of an antecubital vein and collected into tubes containing 3.8% sodium citrate at 9:1 ratio. Optical (turbidometric) aggregometry was assessed at 37°C at a constant stirring speed in a lumi-aggregometer (Model 700, Chrono-log Corp, Havertown, Penn) and assessed as maximal aggregation responses, as previously described. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from the supernatant after centrifugation of blood at 2500 g for 2 periods of 10 minutes. The aggregation of platelets was induced using adenosine diphosphate at final concentrations of 1umol/L and 10 umol/L. Endothelial function testing: Endothelial function was assessed via a validated methodology. This evaluates changes in pulse-wave amplitude in response to a flow-mediated stimulus, recorded with a peripheral arterial tonometer device placed over the tip of each index finger (Endo-PAT2000, Itamar Medical Ltd, Caesarea, Israel). The peripheral arterial tonometry hyperemia index (RHI) is defined as the ratio of the average pulse wave amplitude during the 1-minute period of reactive hyperemia compared with the average pulse wave amplitude during a 210-second preocclusion baseline period. Endothelial independent response was evaluated following 400 ug of sublingual nitroglycerin (Nitrolingual Pumpspray, Sanofi- Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ).
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 4
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately). 2 Mean arterial pressure
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).3 Platelet aggregation
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).4 Endothelial function
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).5
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
List additional health endpoints (separately).6
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What is the study design? Controlled Trial
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Randomized or Non-Randomized? NCT
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome?
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Optional: Name of Method or short description Endothelial function was assessed via a validated methodology. This evaluates changes in pulse-wave amplitude in response to a flow-mediated stimulus, recorded with a peripheral arterial tonometer device placed over the tip of each index finger (Endo-PAT2000, Itamar Medical Ltd, Caesarea, Israel). The peripheral arterial tonometry hyperemia index (RHI) is defined as the ratio of the average pulse wave amplitude during the 1-minute period of reactive hyperemia compared with the average pulse wave amplitude during a 210-second preocclusion baseline period. Endothelial independent response was evaluated following 400 ug of sublingual nitroglycerin (Nitrolingual Pumpspray, Sanofi- Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ).
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Caffeine (general)
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other? Energy drinks
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Measured or self reported? Measured
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Control group drinking energy drink containing no caffeine.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) All data are presented as mean +/- SEM. Comparisons between groups and for change in parameters from baseline were performed by unpaired t test. Subjects were included if they consumed energy drinks infrequently (<1 drink per month) and had no documented coronary artery disease and no risk factors for coronary artery disease.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What conflicts of interest were reported? Authors stated, "No author has a conflict of interest with this work."
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
Refid 20103032
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |
What were the sources of funding? Dr. Sanders is supported by the National Heart Foundation of Australia.
  • Comments Comments (
    0
    ) |




Results & Comparisons

No Results found.