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Study Title and Description

Effect of caffeine on upper-body anaerobic performance in wrestlers in simulated competition-day conditions.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Effect of caffeine on upper-body anaerobic performance in wrestlers in simulated competition-day conditions.
Author M Aedma,S Timpmann,V Ööpik,
Country
Year 2013
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? Peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) attained in upper body sprint performance test are considered important factors for competitive success in wrestling. This study aimed to determine whether acute caffeine ingestion would better maintain PP and MP across a simulated competition day in wrestling.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Study design: The participants visited the laboratory three times with 5–7 days between consecutive visits. During their first visit, the participants were familiarized with the testing devices and procedures. On the 2nd and 3rd visit, the participants completed a series of UBISP tests in a manner that simulated an ordinary competition day in BJJ and SW. In these sports, during a competition 6-min matches take place with relatively short (approximately 30 min) recovery periods and to win a competition, an average of four matches are fought. Therefore, our wrestlers accomplished four 6-min UBISP tests with 30-min recovery periods between the consecutive tests. Caffeine (CAF) or placebo (glucose; PLC) were administered in a double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover manner before the first UBISP test of each simulated competition day. HR was monitored using a standard Suunto HR belt (Suunto Oy, Finland) and recorded in real time to a desktop computer using Suunto Monitor software (version 1.1.2 Suunto Oy, Finland). HRPEAK was the highest HR value during the UBISP test. Early recovery heart rate (HRER) was recorded at the end of the 4th min of recovery. Late recovery heart rate (HRLR) was measured as the last 5 min average of the 10 min supine position resting phase.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate.
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? RCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description HR was monitored using a standard Suunto HR belt (Suunto Oy, Finland) and recorded in real time to a desktop computer using Suunto Monitor software (version 1.1.2 Suunto Oy, Finland). HRPEAK was the highest HR value during the UBISP test. Early recovery heart rate (HRER) was recorded at the end of the 4th min of recovery. Late recovery heart rate (HRLR) was measured as the last 5 min average of the 10 min supine position resting phase.
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Caffeine vs. placebo
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) The Statistica 10 software was used for performing statistical analysis. Data are expressed as mean ± SD . Normality of all data sets was examined using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The effect of caffeine ingestion on performance, heart rate, RPE and RPF was assessed using repeated-measures ANOVA (trial and test as factors with 2 and 4 levels, respectively). The blood data were analyzed with 3-way analysis of variance (trial, test, and pre- and postperformance test as factors). In all analyses, a Tukey’s HSD post hoc was used to identify specific differences within and between the trials. Significant deviations from sphericity were tested with the Mauchly sphericity test. When a violation of sphericity was observed, the Greenhouse-Geisser correction was employed. Statistical significance was set at p < .05.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? "There are no conflicts of interest from any author."
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Refid 23751521
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What were the sources of funding? "This study was funded by target-financed theme No. 1787 from the Ministry of Education and Research of the Republic of Estonia."
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.