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Study Title and Description

Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.
Author S Haller,C Rodriguez,D Moser,S Toma,J Hofmeister,I Sinanaj,D Van De Ville,P Giannakopoulos,KO Lovblad,
Country
Year 2013
Numbers

Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? Using a double-blinded, placebo-controlled design, we assessed the impact of caffeine on brain activation during an n-back verbal WM task in cognitively preserved elderly participants. Potential effects of caffeine include specific task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. The current investigation explores all three potential effects of caffeine: task-related activations using a hypothesis driven general linear model (GLM) analysis, functional connectivity using data-driven tensorial-independent component analysis (TICA) and direct vascular effects using arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) In a prospective crossover design, each participant had 2 scanning days separated by 1 or 2 weeks. Half of the participants had caffeine at day 1 and placebo at day 2, and the other half had the inverse order of substances. Medication was applied in a double-blinded way. One capsule (caffeine 200 mg or placebo) was taken per os 30 min prior to the MR imaging in agreement with previous investigations (Mulderink et al., 2002; Liu et al., 2004; Behzadi and Liu, 2006; Perthen et al., 2008; Rack-Gomer et al., 2009), corresponding to approximately 2–2.5 cups of coffee. Participants performed an n-back task, a well established WM task in fMRI (for example, see metaanalysis in (Owen et al., 2005)). Briefly, a sequence of letters was presented visually on an MR compatible canvas in the MRI scanner. In the active 2-back condition, targets are letters that are identical to the letter presented two items ago (e.g. ‘‘a f h f’’). This task has a high demand on WM. In the control condition 0-back, the target is a pre-defined letter (e.g. ‘‘x’’). This control condition has similar demands on visual processing yet requires only minimal WM. Both conditions are contrasted to evaluate the effect of WM demand in 2-back versus the control condition 0-back. Participants were familiarized with the task demands outside the MRI using a training session. Each run consisted of alternation blocks of 35 s each for conditions 2-back and 0-back with alternating rest conditions of 15 s to allow the hemodynamic response to recover from the previous block. Each condition was repeated five times in a pseudo-randomized order. Participants provided response (target versus no target) via an MR compatible response box for targets (33% of trials) and another button for non-targets. Including an initial fixation period, each run lasted 8–10 min, and each participant performed two runs per day. MR imaging: MR imaging was performed on a clinical routine whole body 3.0T MR scanner (TRIO, Siemens medical systems, Erlangen, Germany). Functional imaging implemented a standard echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with the following fundamental parameters: whole brain coverage, 74 x 74 matrix, 40 slices, voxel size 2.97 x 2.97 x 3.0 mm3, echo time (TE) 26 ms, repetition time (TR) 2500 ms, 196 repetitions. An additional 3DT1 sequence was acquired for spatial normalization with the following fundamental parameters: 256 x 256 matrix, 176 slices, 1 x 1 x1 mm3, TE 2.3 ms, TR 2300 ms. Additionally, a pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) sequence was acquired: 64 x 64 matrix, 24 slices, voxel size 3.44 x 3.44 x 5 mm3, TE 12 ms, TR 4000 ms, inversion time (TI) 1600 ms. Additional sequences (T2w, DTI, fluid attenuated inversion recovery FLAIR) were acquired and analyzed to rule out concomitant disease. Analysis of ASL perfusion: The reconstructed relCBF ASL perfusion images were spatially normalized using a linear transformation equivalent to pre-processing of the functional MRI data. We first analyzed the average ASL signal of CAFFEINE versus PLACEBO using a repeated measure t-test, followed by a voxel-wise group-level permutation testing in RANDOMISE, part of FSL with threshold-free cluster enhancement (TFCE) correction for multiple comparisons, considering fully corrected p-values<0.05 as significant.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Whole brain global diffusion
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? NCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description MR imaging was performed on a clinical routine whole body 3.0T MR scanner (TRIO, Siemens medical systems, Erlangen, Germany).
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Caffeine (general) Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other?
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Placebo vs. 200 caffeine.
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) All participants had normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and none reported a history of major medical disorders (cancer, cardiac illness), sustained head injury, psychiatric or neurological disorders, and alcohol or drug abuse. Subjects with regular use of psychotropics, stimulants and .-blockers were excluded. All participants were habitual caffeine consumers taking one to three cups of coffee per day. White matter lesions, presumably related to microvascular leucoencephalopathy, are frequent in the investigated age-group. To limit the impact of this confounding factor, we included only volunteers with a maximum of a Fazekas score of 1. Statistical analysis was performed in Graphpad Prism, Version 5. After normality testing (D’Agostino & Pearson’s omnibus normality test), the participant’s average reaction time and response accuracy for 2-back and 0-back were compared between CAFFEINE versus PLACEBO using repeated-measures t-tests.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? No conflicts were reported by the authors.
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Refid 23876323
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What were the sources of funding? "This work is supported by Swiss National Foundation Grant SNF 3200B0-116193 and SPUM 33CM30- 124111."
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.