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Study Title and Description

The combination of short rest and energy drink consumption as fatigue countermeasures during a prolonged drive of professional truck drivers.



Key Questions Addressed
1 For [population], is caffeine intake above [exposure dose], compared to intakes [exposure dose] or less, associated with adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes?
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Primary Publication Information
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TitleData
Title The combination of short rest and energy drink consumption as fatigue countermeasures during a prolonged drive of professional truck drivers.
Author A Ronen,T Oron-Gilad,P Gershon,
Country
Year 2014
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Secondary Publication Information
There are currently no secondary publications defined for this study.


Extraction Form: Cardiovascular Design
Design Details
Question... Follow Up Answer Follow-up Answer
What outcome is being evaluated in this paper? Cardiovascular
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What is the objective of the study (as reported by the authors)? One of the major concerns for professional drivers is fatigue. Many studies evaluated specific fatigue countermeasures, in many cases comparing the efficiency of each method separately. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of rest areas combined with consumption of energy drinks on professional truck drivers during a prolonged simulated drive.
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Provide a general description of the methods as reported by the authors. Information should be extracted based on relevance to the SR (i.e., caffeine related methods) Subjects: Fifteen healthy professional truck drivers (ages 24–49 years) with a Minimum five years of experience participated in the study. Participants received monetary compensation for their participation. Outcome measures: Physiological measure: as in previous studies (e.g., Gershon et al., 2009), ECG signals were recorded from two skin surface electrodes at a sampling rate of 500 Hz using an ‘Atlas Researches Ltd.’ polygraph located in the back seat of the car and connected to a PC by an optic fiber. R wave peaks were detected and R–R intervals were calculated and the total change in HRV was determined. Previous studies (De Waard, 1996; Gershon et al., 2009) showed that HRV can be sensitive to changes in fatigue and workload during the drive. Study protocol and design: This was a within-participant study with three conditions/sessions. Each session included a different treatment. The order of the sessions was counterbalanced across participants. Control session: this session included drinking 500ml of placebo containing only non-sugary flavors. Drive for 150 min and rest after the drive period was completed for additional 10 min in the car. After resting, each participant filled the SOFI and the modified NASA-TLX questionnaires. Energy Drink session: similar to the control session except that participants were asked to drink 500 ml of an energy drink (i.e., two cans, each can contained: 21 g sucrose, 5 g glucose, 1 g taurine, 80 mg caffeine, 600 mg glucuronolactone, 50 mg insositol, and vitamin B complex). The participants were asked to drink the entire amount in 5 min or less prior to the initiation of the drive before filling the initial questionnaires. Energy Drink + Rest session: similar to the previous sessions it included drinking the energy drink, as detailed in the Energy Drink session. Then, in addition to resting in a designed resting area for 10 min after completion of the drive (as in the first two sessions), an additional resting period was introduced, 100 min into the drive at a designated rest area, as shown in Fig. 2.
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How many outcome-specific endpoints are evaluated? 1
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What is the (or one of the) endpoint(s) evaluated? (Each endpoint listed separately) Heart rate varaibility
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List additional health endpoints (separately). 2
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List additional health endpoints (separately).3
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List additional health endpoints (separately).4
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List additional health endpoints (separately).5
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List additional health endpoints (separately).6
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Clinical, physiological, other Physiological
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What is the study design? Controlled Trial
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Randomized or Non-Randomized? NCT
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What were the diagnostics or methods used to measure the outcome? Objective
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Optional: Name of Method or short description ECG signals were recorded from two skin surface electrodes at a sampling rate of 500 Hz using an ‘Atlas Researches Ltd.’ polygraph located in the back seat of the car and connected to a PC by an optic fiber. R wave peaks were detected and R–R intervals were calculated and the total change in HRV was determined. Previous studies (De Waard, 1996; Gershon et al., 2009) showed that HRV can be sensitive to changes in fatigue and workload during the drive.
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Caffeine (general)
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Coffee, Chocolate, energy drink, gum, medicine/supplement, soda, tea, other? Energy drinks
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Measured or self reported? Measured
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Children, adolescents, adults, or pregnant included? Adults
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What was the reference, comparison, or control group(s)? (e.g. high vs low consumption, number of cups, etc.) Caffeine exposure was 500 ml of an energy drink (i.e., two cans, each can contained: 21 g sucrose, 5 g glucose, 1 g taurine, 80 mg caffeine, 600 mg glucuronolactone, 50 mg insositol, and vitamin B complex). Placebo drink was 500 ml of placebo containing only non-sugary flavors.
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What were the listed confounders or modifying factors as stated by the authors? (e.g. multi-variable components of models.  Copy from methods) The participants were requested to arrive at the driving simulator lab after a full night sleep and not to consume any alcoholic or caffeinated drinks at least 4 h before the experimental sessions started.
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What conflicts of interest were reported? Not discussed.
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Refid 24913484
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What were the sources of funding? This study was supported in part by a grant from the unit for preventing actions ("Peula Monaat") of the Israeli Ministry of Industry, Trade, Commerce and Labor.
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Results & Comparisons

No Results found.