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Completed Systematic Reviews




Neuroprotection for treatment of glaucoma in adults (2013)


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Statistics: 1 Study, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: Background: Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of conditions involving progressive damage to the optic nerve, deterioration of retinal ganglion cells and ultimately visual field loss. It is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Open angle glaucoma (OAG), the commonest form of glaucoma, is a chronic condition that may or may not present with increased intraocular pressure (IOP). Neuroprotection for glaucoma refers to any intervention intended to prevent optic nerve damage or cell death. Objectives: To systematically examine the evidence regarding the effectiveness of neuroprotective agents for slowing the progression of OAG in adults.
Contributor(s): Sena DF, Lindsley K. Neuroprotection for treatment of glaucoma in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD006539. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006539.pub3.
Funding Source: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA (Grant 1 U 01 EY020522)
Methodology Description: Search methods: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 16 October 2012. Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which topical or oral treatments were used for neuroprotection in adults with OAG. Minimum follow up time was four years. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from the literature searches. Full-text copies of potentially relevant studies were obtained and re-evaluated for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted data related study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcome data. One trial was identified for this review, thus we performed no meta-analysis. Two studies comparing memantine to placebo are currently awaiting classification until additional study details are provided. We documented reasons for excluding studies from the review.

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Perioperative antibiotics for prevention of acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery (2017)


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Statistics: 4 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery compared with no prophylaxis or other form of prophylaxis.
Contributor(s): Gower EW, Lindsley K, Tulenko SE, Nanji AA, Leyngold I, McDonnell PJ.
Funding Source: None Provided
Methodology Description: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Epub Ahead of Print, In‐Process & Other Non‐Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily (January 1946 to December 2016), Embase (January 1980 to December 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to December 2016),the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 6 December 2016. We also searched for additional studies that cited any included trials using the Science Citation Index.

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Peripheral iridotomy for pigmentary glaucoma (2016)


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Statistics: 5 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: Background: Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell death resulting in damage to the optic nerve head and the retinal nerve fiber layer. Pigment dispersion syndrome is characterized by a structural disturbance in the iris pigment epithelium (the densely pigmented posterior surface of the iris) that leads to dispersion of the pigment and its deposition on various structures within the eye. Pigmentary glaucoma is a specific form of open-angle glaucoma found in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Topcial medical therapy is usually the first-line treatment; however, peripheral laser iridotomy has been proposed as an alternate treatment. Peripheral laser iridotomy involves creating an opening in the iris tissue to allow drainage of fluid from the posterior chamber to the anterior chamber and vice versa. Equalizing the pressure within the eye may help to alleviate the friction that leads to pigment dispersion and prevent visual field deterioration. However, the effectiveness of peripheral laser iridotomy in reducing the development or progression of pigmentary glaucoma is unknown. Objectives: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of peripheral laser iridotomy compared with other interventions, including medication, trabeculoplasty, and trabeculectomy, or no treatment, for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma.
Contributor(s): Michelessi M, Lindsley K. Peripheral iridotomy for pigmentary glaucoma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD005655. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005655.pub2.
Funding Source: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA (Grant 1 U 01 EY020522)
Methodology Description: Search methods: We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE and clinical trials websites such as (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 November 2015. Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had compared peripheral laser iridotomy versus no treatment or other treatments for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Data collection and analysis: We used standard methodological procedures for systematic reviews. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility, extracted data, and assessed included trials for risk of bias. We did not perform a meta-analysis because of variability in reporting and follow-up intervals for primary and secondary outcomes of interest.

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Surgical interventions for primary congenital glaucoma (2015)


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Statistics: 6 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: Background: Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) manifests within the first few years of a child's life and is not associated with any other systemic or ocular abnormalities. PCG results in considerable morbidity even in developed countries. Several surgical techniques for treating this condition, and lowering the intraocular pressure (IOP) associated with it, have been described. Objectives: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different surgical techniques for PCG.
Contributor(s): Deepta Ghate, Xue Wang
Funding Source: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA (Grant 1 U01 EY020522); National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), UK
Methodology Description: Search methods: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 23 June 2014. Selection criteria: We included all randomized and quasi-randomized trials in which different types of surgical interventions were compared in children under five years of age with PCG. Data collection and analysis :We used standard methodological procedures specified by The Cochrane Collaboration.

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Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis (2014)


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Statistics: 4 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: OBJECTIVES: The objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Secondary objectives included evaluation of health economic outcomes and quality of life outcomes.
Contributor(s): Herretes S, Wang X, Reyes JMG. Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD005430. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005430.pub3.
Funding Source: Grant 1 U01 EY020522, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA
Methodology Description: SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 14 July 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index to identify additional studies that had cited the only trial included in the original version of this review, reference lists of included trials, earlier reviews, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines. We also contacted experts to identify any unpublished and ongoing randomized trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had evaluated adjunctive therapy with topical corticosteroids in people with bacterial keratitis who were being treated with antibiotics. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.

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