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Completed Systematic Reviews




Early Intensive Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review Update


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 80 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 25, 2019 05:51AM
Description: The objective of this study was to systematically review studies of early intensive behavioral and developmental approaches that may improve outcomes for children with ASD.
Contributor(s): Amy S. Weitlauf, Ph.D. Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H. Brittany Peters, M.D. Nila Sathe, M.A., M.L.I.S. Rebekah Travis, Psy.D. Rachel Aiello, Ph.D. Edwin Williamson, M.D. Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, M.D. Shanthi Krishnaswami, M.B.B.S., M.P.H. Rebecca Jerome, M.L.I.S., M.P.H. Zachary Warren, Ph.D.
Funding Source: This project was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (contract number: HHSA290201200009I)
Methodology Description: Our primary literature search employed three databases: MEDLINE® via the PubMed interface, PsycINFO® (psychology and psychiatry literature), and the Educational Resources Information Clearinghouse. Our search strategies used a combination of subject heading terms appropriate for each database and key words relevant to ASD (e.g., autism, Asperger). We limited searches to the English language and literature published since the development of the 2011 AHRQ review on management of ASD. Two reviewers independently assessed studies against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted data regarding participant and intervention characteristics, assessment techniques, and outcomes and assigned quality and strength of evidence ratings using predetermined methods.

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The shortcomings of cluster-randomized controlled trials for the assessment of complex interventions in general practices: a systematic review


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 29 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 25, 2019 05:50AM
Description: None Provided
Contributor(s): Professor Andrea Siebenhofer-Kroitzsch, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany Dr Christiane Muth, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany Dr Birgit Fullerton, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany Professor Paul Glasziou, Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Bond University, Australia Professor Elaine Beller, Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Bond University, Australia Mrs Sarah Thorning, Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Bond University, Australia Professor Andrea Berghold, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Austria Dr Klaus Jeitler, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Austria Ms Gudrun Pregartner, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Austria Ms Jennifer Engler, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany Dr Gudrun Klein, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany Mr Michael Paulitsch, Institute of General Practice, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt, Germany
Funding Source: This review will be funded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ: 01KG1504); approval date: 05/2015
Methodology Description: None Provided

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Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Adults With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): A Systematic Review Update


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 0 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: This systematic review is an update of a 2013 report that evaluated psychological and pharmacological treatments of adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The purpose of this review is to update the earlier work, expand the range of treatments examined, address earlier uncertainties, identify ways to improve care for PTSD patients, and reduce variation in existing treatment guidelines.
Contributor(s): Valerie Hoffman, Ph.D., M.P.H.; Jennifer Cook Middleton, Ph.D.; Cynthia Feltner, M.D., M.P.H.; Bradley N. Gaynes, M.D., M.P.H.; Rachel Palmieri Weber, Ph.D.; Carla Bann, Ph.D.; Meera Viswanathan, Ph.D.; Kathleen N. Lohr, Ph.D., M.Phil., M.A.; Claire Baker; Joshua Green, B.A.
Funding Source: This report is based on research conducted by the RTI-UNC Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).
Methodology Description: We systematically searched, reviewed, and analyzed the scientific evidence gathered to help answer our KQs. We began with a focused MEDLINE® search for eligible interventions using a combination of medical subject headings (MeSH®) and title and abstract keywords, limiting the search to human-only studies (from inception through September 29, 2017). We also searched the Cochrane Library, the Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry, PsycINFO, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress database using analogous search terms. These searches included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials, and systematic reviews. All titles and abstracts identified via searches were duly reviewed by trained research team members, and the full texts of those included articles were then retrieved and reviewed, and a final determination about inclusion was made. Data from included articles was abstracted, and information included in the report and appendices (see supplemental data files).

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Diet-Related Fibers and Human Health Outcomes, Version 3.0 (Retired)


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 983 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 9 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest. This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.
Contributor(s): Nicola McKeown (PI), Mei Chung (Co-I), Kara Livingston (Project & Data Manager), Caleigh Sawicki, Danielle Haslam, Deena Wang, Caitlin Blakeley, Yinan Jia, Nicole Baruch, Micaela Karlsen, Carrie Brown
Funding Source: International Life Sciences Institute – North America branch (ILSI-NA)
Methodology Description: Please see user manual.

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Interventions to Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Clinical Alzheimer’s-Type Dementia [Entered Retrospectively]


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 263 Studies, 3 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: This review assessed evidence for interventions aimed at preventing or delaying the onset of age-related cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or clinical Alzheimer’s-type dementia (CATD).
Contributor(s): Robert L. Kane, M.D. Mary Butler, Ph.D., M.B.A. Howard A. Fink, M.D., M.P.H. Michelle Brasure, Ph.D., M.L.I.S. Heather Davila, M.P.A. Priyanka Desai, M.H.P. Eric Jutkowitz, B.A. Ellen McCreedy, Ph.D. Victoria A. Nelson, M.Sc. J. Riley McCarten, M.D. Collin Calvert, B.A. Edward Ratner, M.D. Laura S. Hemmy, Ph.D. Terry Barclay, Ph.D., L.P.
Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (Contract No. 290-2015-00008-I)
Methodology Description: Two investigators screened abstracts and full-text articles of identified references. Eligible studies included randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental observational studies published to September, 2016, enrolling people with normal cognition and/or MCI. We extracted data, assessed risk of bias, summarized results for studies without high risk of bias, and evaluated strength of evidence for studies with sufficient sample size. Cognitive outcomes were grouped into domains to facilitate analysis; strength of evidence was assessed by MCI or CATD incidence, and cognitive outcome domain.

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