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Completed Systematic Reviews




Diet-Related Fibers and Human Health Outcomes, Version 3.0 (Retired)


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 983 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 9 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest. This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.
Contributor(s): Nicola McKeown (PI), Mei Chung (Co-I), Kara Livingston (Project & Data Manager), Caleigh Sawicki, Danielle Haslam, Deena Wang, Caitlin Blakeley, Yinan Jia, Nicole Baruch, Micaela Karlsen, Carrie Brown
Funding Source: International Life Sciences Institute – North America branch (ILSI-NA)
Methodology Description: Please see user manual.

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Interventions to Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Clinical Alzheimer’s-Type Dementia [Entered Retrospectively]


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 263 Studies, 3 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: This review assessed evidence for interventions aimed at preventing or delaying the onset of age-related cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or clinical Alzheimer’s-type dementia (CATD).
Contributor(s): Robert L. Kane, M.D. Mary Butler, Ph.D., M.B.A. Howard A. Fink, M.D., M.P.H. Michelle Brasure, Ph.D., M.L.I.S. Heather Davila, M.P.A. Priyanka Desai, M.H.P. Eric Jutkowitz, B.A. Ellen McCreedy, Ph.D. Victoria A. Nelson, M.Sc. J. Riley McCarten, M.D. Collin Calvert, B.A. Edward Ratner, M.D. Laura S. Hemmy, Ph.D. Terry Barclay, Ph.D., L.P.
Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (Contract No. 290-2015-00008-I)
Methodology Description: Two investigators screened abstracts and full-text articles of identified references. Eligible studies included randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental observational studies published to September, 2016, enrolling people with normal cognition and/or MCI. We extracted data, assessed risk of bias, summarized results for studies without high risk of bias, and evaluated strength of evidence for studies with sufficient sample size. Cognitive outcomes were grouped into domains to facilitate analysis; strength of evidence was assessed by MCI or CATD incidence, and cognitive outcome domain.

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Breastfeeding Programs and Policies, Breastfeeding Uptake, and Maternal Health Outcomes in Developed Countries


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 147 Studies, 2 Key Questions, 2 Extraction Forms,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: The goal of this project is to summarize the effectiveness of community, workplace, and health care system–based programs and policies aimed at supporting and promoting breastfeeding and determine the association between breastfeeding and maternal health.
Contributor(s): Cynthia Feltner, M.D., M.P.H. Rachel Palmieri Weber, Ph.D. Alison Stuebe, M.D., M.Sc. Catherine A. Grodensky, M.P.H. Colin Orr, M.D. Meera Viswanathan, Ph.D.
Funding Source: This report was funded by the Office on Women’s Health at the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through an interagency agreement with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Methodology Description: We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL from January 1, 1980, to October 12, 2017, for studies relevant to the effectiveness of health care system–based, workplace, and community breastfeeding programs and policies. For evidence on breastfeeding and maternal health, we updated the 2007 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality report on this topic and searched the same databases from November 1, 2005, to October 12, 2017. For studies of breastfeeding programs and policies, trials, systematic reviews, and observational studies with a control group were eligible; we excluded primary care–based programs delivered as part of routine care. For studies related to breastfeeding and maternal health, we included systematic reviews, case-control and cohort studies. Pairs of reviewers independently selected, extracted data from, and rated the risk of bias of relevant studies; they graded the strength of evidence (SOE) using established criteria. We synthesized all evidence qualitatively.

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Diet-Related Fibers and Human Health Outcomes, Version 3.1 (Retired)


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 991 Studies, 1 Key Question, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: The objectives of this database are to: 1. Systematically compile and provide access to primary, English-language, peer-reviewed science linking dietary fiber intake in humans to one or more of 10 potential health benefits 2. Provide researchers with a tool to understand how different fibers are characterized in studies 3. Facilitate researchers in identifying gaps in the current research 4. Create a database to serve as a starting foundation of primary human literature for conducting evidence-based reviews and meta-analyses 5. Efficiently assist researchers in identifying fibers of interest. This database should serve as a foundation for future work. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, detailed in the user manual, were applied in determining database eligibility; thus, this database is not intended to serve as a sole source for identifying all possible fiber literature for the purposes of conducting a meta-analysis or systematic review. This database contains Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) data to help users formulate and narrow the focus of their research question. It is expected that secondary searches will be conducted to augment this database.
Contributor(s): Nicola McKeown (PI), Mei Chung (Co-I), Kara Livingston (Project & Data Manager), Caleigh Sawicki, Danielle Haslam, Deena Wang, Caitlin Blakeley, Yinan Jia, Nicole Baruch, Micaela Karlsen, Carrie Brown
Funding Source: International Life Sciences Institute – North America branch (ILSI-NA)
Methodology Description: Please see user manual.

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Assessment Tools for Palliative Care


Public Project Complete

Statistics: 213 Studies, 4 Key Questions, 1 Extraction Form,
Date Published: Mar 21, 2019 09:12AM
Description: Technical Brief
Contributor(s): Rebecca Aslakson, M.D., Ph.D. Sydney M. Dy, M.D., M.S. Renee F. Wilson, M.S. Julie M. Waldfogel, Pharm.D. Allen Zhang, B.S. Sarina R. Isenberg, M.A. Alex Blair, M.D. Joshua Sixon, B.S. Karen A. Robinson, Ph.D.
Funding Source: AHRQ
Methodology Description: First, we engaged Key Informants representing both patient/caregiver and provider/researcher perspectives to help guide the project. We then sought systematic reviews of palliative care assessment tools and applications of tools through searches of PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycINFO and PsycTESTS from January 1, 2007 to August 29, 2016. We conducted supplemental searches of information on palliative care tools, including comprehensive reviews published prior to our date limitation, Web sites, and a targeted search for primary articles to identify tools where no recent high-quality systematic review was identified. We organized tools by the eight domains (subdomains) from the National Consensus Project Clinical Practice Guidelines for Palliative Care: structure and process, physical, psychological and psychiatric, social (caregiver), spiritual and religious, cultural, care at the end of life (bereavement), ethical and legal; as well as a ninth domain for multidimensional tools (quality of life and patient experience).

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